PeatPeat is a soil type formed from slowly decomposing vegetation. It is found in wet areas where the lack of oxygen slows the breakdown of plant matter. Peatlands are areas... More is a soil type formed from slowly decomposing vegetation. It is found in wet areas where the lack of oxygen slows the breakdown of plant matter. Peatlands are areas containing peat. They support distinct types of vegetation. Peat bogs are particularly wet areas of peatlandPeat is a soil type formed from slowly decomposing vegetation. It is found in wet areas where the lack of oxygen slows the breakdown of plant matter. Peatlands are areas... More. Peatlands and bogs occur widely in the ArcticDefinitions of the Arctic vary according to environmental, geographical, political, cultural and scientific perspectives. Some scientists define the Arctic as areas having a high latitude, long winters, short, cool summers,... More. The presence of permafrost reduces drainage of upper soil layers. Also low temperatures slow down the rate of plant matter breakdown (decomposition). These conditions favour the build-up of peat. Arctic tundraA type of ecosystem in which tree growth is limited by low temperatures. The origin of the word is from from the Kildin Sami word tūndâr, meaning "uplands" or "treeless mountain tract". In the northern... More regions contain about 12-14% of the world’s soil carbon. Boreal and subarctic regions hold an estimated 30% of global soil carbon.

See also Palsa mireA type of mire (or boggy wetland) complex found in boreal and alpine regions. Palsas are peat mounds, sometimes containing permafrost. The palsas are usually 2-4 metres high, palsas up to 7 metres high have... More.

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