INTERACT is a pan-arctic network of research stations covering all major environmental envelopes/ecozones (A.-F.) in the ArcticDefinitions of the Arctic vary according to environmental, geographical, political, cultural and scientific perspectives. Some scientists define the Arctic as areas having a high latitude, long winters, short, cool summers,... More and adjacent borealNorthern, from Boreas, the Greek god of the north wind.... More forest and northern alpine areas. All INTERACT activities, including Trans-National Access, have the overarching goal to respond to six major societal challenges of local and global relevance (SC1 – SC6). Each station providing Trans-National, Remote or Virtual Access have identified one or more societal challenges, to which their facilities are especially suitable to respond by research. The resulting Infrastructure Matrix below can be used to identify the stations, which would be the best suited for your research.

How to use the Infrastructure Matrix

1. Choose the Societal Challange (SC1-SC6) that is most related to your research topic.

2. Choose the environmental envelope/ecozone of your interests.

3. Look at the meeting point of the two variables. The numbers (with links) refer to those stations whose facilities and possibilities offered are especially suited to support research within the societal challenge in question (see explanation below).

Explanations to the symbols used in the Matrix

Numbers refer to different INTERACT stations offering TA, RA or VA, and there is a link from each number to the particular station’s description on the INTERACT website.

The letters A.-F. refer to the environmental envelope/ecozone where the station is located:

A. High-Arctic and tundraA type of ecosystem in which tree growth is limited by low temperatures. The origin of the word is from from the Kildin Sami word t?ndâr, meaning "uplands" or "treeless mountain tract". In the northern... More stations with continuous permafrostPermafrost is frozen ground that remains at or below zero degrees Celsius (32 degrees Fahrenheit) for two or more years. It forms in regions where the mean annual temperature is... More

B. TundraA type of ecosystem in which tree growth is limited by low temperatures. The origin of the word is from from the Kildin Sami word t?ndâr, meaning "uplands" or "treeless mountain tract". In the northern... More and borealNorthern, from Boreas, the Greek god of the north wind.... More forest stations with discontinuous permafrostPermafrost is frozen ground that remains at or below zero degrees Celsius (32 degrees Fahrenheit) for two or more years. It forms in regions where the mean annual temperature is... More

C. TundraA type of ecosystem in which tree growth is limited by low temperatures. The origin of the word is from from the Kildin Sami word t?ndâr, meaning "uplands" or "treeless mountain tract". In the northern... More and borealNorthern, from Boreas, the Greek god of the north wind.... More forest stations with sporadic permafrostPermafrost is frozen ground that remains at or below zero degrees Celsius (32 degrees Fahrenheit) for two or more years. It forms in regions where the mean annual temperature is... More

D. BorealNorthern, from Boreas, the Greek god of the north wind.... More forest stations with no permafrostPermafrost is frozen ground that remains at or below zero degrees Celsius (32 degrees Fahrenheit) for two or more years. It forms in regions where the mean annual temperature is... More

E. Mountain and alpine stations

F. North-Atlantic and temperate forest stations.

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